The ProLife Team Podcast 97 | Patrina Mosley & Jacob Barr | Talking About Racism & Abortion

The ProLife Team Podcast
The ProLife Team Podcast 97 | Patrina Mosley & Jacob Barr | Talking About Racism & Abortion
Loading
/

Listen to Patrina Mosley answer Jacob’s questions for a new museum exhibit on Racism and Abortion.

Summary

This is Jacob Barr, and I recently had a deeply insightful conversation with Patrina Mosley on the Pro-life Team Podcast. Our discussion centered on the complex issues of abortion, race, and the impact on African American communities. Patrina, with her extensive background in human rights advocacy, shared her perspectives on how abortion and sexual exploitation are interconnected crimes against humanity. We delved into the perceptions of abortion within minority communities, the political exploitation of race and abortion, and the historical and current racial disparities in medical care, especially for pregnant black women.

Patrina highlighted the alarming statistics of black maternal mortality rates and the need to rebuild trust between African American women and the medical industry. We touched on controversial statements by political figures, the impact of abortion on poverty and inequality, and delved into the history and legacy of Margaret Sanger and the Negro Project. Our conversation also explored the comparison of abortion to slavery, legal aspects of race-based abortion, and the disproportional impact of abortion on minorities.

The dialogue included a critique of the Black Lives Matter movement’s alignment with certain political causes and its impact on family and abortion policy. Patrina emphasized the significance of family structure and the role of father figures in black communities. She underscored the institutional racism inherent in abortion policies and passionately argued that the fight against abortion is pivotal in truly valuing black lives.

In summary, our discussion was an in-depth exploration of the multifaceted issues surrounding abortion, race, and their effects on society, particularly the African American community.

Relevant hashtags to this content would be: #ProLife, #AbortionAndRace, #AfricanAmericanCommunities, #HumanRightsAdvocacy, #MaternalMortality, #MargaretSanger, #NegroProject, #BlackLivesMatter, #FamilyStructure, #InstitutionalRacism, #PodcastDiscussion.

Transcript

The transcript was automatically generated and may contain errors.

Patrina Mosley :

Hi, I’m Patrina Mosley and I’m here with Jacob on the Pro-life Team podcast where we are Getting real about abortion and race.

Jacob Barr :

So Patrina, I’m excited to have you on the pro-life Team Podcast, and in this episode, we’re building content for this museum exhibit on abortion and racism. So to get us started, please, yeah, tell us who you are, your background, and what led you to the subject of abortion.

Patrina Mosley :

Yeah well, thank you so much for having me on i’m excited to be here with you and your audience. So I am a policy advisor in the space of human rights. I’ve done human rights advocacy for the last decade and several Christian public policy organizations and at the federal government under the Trump administration in the United States Agency for Development so a focus mostly on women’s issues so sex trafficking, prostitution, all forms of sexual exploitation and abortion and really how all those things are connected as organized crimes against humanity and women.

Jacob Barr :

Awesome so, yeah, So my first question in this, yeah, in this set is do you think minorities in America are mostly pro-choice pro-life undecided or something else?

Patrina Mosley :

Well, I believe most will acknowledge that abortion is wrong, but it’s a personal choice they’ll say, well, yeah, I know it’s wrong, but it’s really up to the women. And that’s been the case because abortion has been around for almost 50 years. So abortion is normal to our society it’s normal to African Americans it’s just normal up until a year ago where it was assumed a right as far as we’re concerned legally. So yeah, they when you look at the scope of who are the most religious people in America. African Americans take the top but we are the most religious ethnic group in the country and so yeah, it’ll be I’m personally against it but I know that it’s wrong yeah that.

Jacob Barr :

Makes sense? So when it comes to, well, race and racism are politically charged ideas that candidates often use to drum up votes, motivate their base, demonize political opponents. When race is combined with the topic of abortion, candidates can swing a lot of votes in their favor by saying the right thing about race and abortion. In your view, how can black voters avoid being taken for granted and stay principled enough to navigate through the rhetoric and manipulation?

Patrina Mosley :

Yeah, good question. First, I would say both sides use blacks for their own advantage. So you have Republicans and Democrats who do that. And what we have to do as African Americans in this country is take control of the narrative and build our own bridges and build our own tables of influence. Blacks don’t need a savior from any political party or movement necessarily they already have a savior. That’s Jesus that’s we just talked about we’re the most religious ethnic group in the country. We just need to be more obedient to Jesus. And that’s for all of us, you know, black whites and everyone else in this country. So they can’t say principle, but they have to do it by being a voice for themselves we have to be our own voice and we have to speak up and speak out we have to control the narrative of what we will tolerate, what we will not tolerate, how we will stick together and how we will call out policies that are to our detriment.

Jacob Barr :

Awesome makes sense. So some claim that black people, and pregnant black women in particular, typically receive unequal medical care, so pregnancy poses a higher risk for black women compared to other women. Is this true? And if so, would it help justify abortion choice policy?

Patrina Mosley :

Yeah so it is statistically true that there are higher black maternal mortality rates than there are of whites. Hence why you have Planned Parenthood and other left-leaning wings will say to African American women that it’s safer for you to abort than to carry the term that this was a direct quote from Planned Parenthood’s Twitter account to outreach to African Americans that is kill your baby because it’s safer for you. And so when you look at the medical data, yes, it’s true there is a higher maternal mortality rate in the black community. But there are other health factors that contribute to that and that need to be addressed such as we have a higher diabetes rate, we have a higher blood pressure rate in our community and other things. So that’s a gap that needs to be explored. But I will touch on this is that you know as a we do as African American women have a shared experience in this country of being treated poorly in medical settings. It’s not like you have black women who are gathering together in cahoots to share the same story across 50 different countries it’s just not the case. But yet when you do see stories highlighted, it’s you see it and you go, wait, yeah, that was me. And you keep hearing that over and over from your grandmother, your auntie, your mother, your sister, your friend. And so there is a general experience that we have as African American woman in this country of being treated poorly, of being not believed when we’re say we’re in pain. And sometimes it’s because you know in theory that medical professionals may think that black women are stronger. So when they say they’re in pain, they’re not really in pain so they delay treatment, they delay epidurals and whatnot. That’s been typically our experience we have to fight for good medical care, for good attention. And actually this was really affirmed to me as I listen to first hand testimonies from former abortionists who are now pro-life advocates who have said in many interviews, and I’ll highlight just one, that in the medical profession, especially those who are doing abortions, they did not care about black women it was generally understood that if you are a you are from a lower economic class or someone that is deemed inferior, you will get inferior care. They will brush you aside, pump you up with Iuds and other contraceptives and send you out the door and not ask any questions and not care about you. And actually a good example that talks about how the medical professions can really deem certain classes of people as inferior. It’s a great book by doctor John Buchowski, who is the founder of Divine Mercy Care and tells his story in a recent memoir of how he went from being an abortionist to being a pro-life advocate in his book Save to Patients. So if anybody’s interested in that and this is someone who’s from the medical industry who will tell you that they deemed certain people as inferior and thus gave them less care. So yeah, this is something that we do need to talk about in the pro-life community and a way to remedy that is to rebuild the doctor patient relationship between the health industry in African American women. That doesn’t start with abortion for sure. So yeah, there is a rebuilding of trust that needs to happen between African American women in the medical industry that needs to start with the medical industry. A recent example is out of Atlanta, georgia there was a teen pregnancy that was in delivery at a local hospital and the couple is not married. They are suing this hospital for the death of their of their child that was delivered with no head this child was delivered decapitated and it was because the doctor in the lawsuit, so this is allegedly the doctor pulled on the baby so hard as it was coming out of the birth canal that the head was severed and handed the baby over to this woman as she just finished her delivery with no head can you understand how devastating that is? And you know, this is a African American woman who is less than 21 years old with her partner they’re not married. And once again, it kind of rings up the bells of we deem you inferior and we’re giving you less care. And this is just in the last month. So I do a couple of hours at my local pregnancy center, and we see all colors i just want to make that known we see all colors in our centers and this one couple who’s happened to be black was asking who to chose life in a very hard circumstance. They asked me for recommendations for good healthcare and for a doula because they don’t want what happened in Georgia to happen to them because it is a well known, accepted fact amongst the black community, amongst women in the black community that you’re not going to be treated as well as whites in the health community. And so this recent example in Georgia is just like I said recent and it we need to start to rebuild the trust between the medical industry and black women and it doesn’t start with abortion.

Jacob Barr :

Well, what a devastating story that’s so sad to hear and just yeah, that’s really hard, President Joe Biden, on the campaign trail said if you have a problem figuring out whether you’re for Joe Biden or Donald Trump, then you ain’t black. Now biden was the Democrat presidential candidate at the time and a committed pro-choice or at the time. What do you think of this quote is it just poorly worded, A bad joke or perhaps it’s perpetuating the idea that black people feel a sense of duty to support pro-choice slash Democrat.

Patrina Mosley :

Well, I think anything from Joe Biden’s mouth is just a bad joke, whether he’s trying to tell a joke or not so I mean the whole, the whole presidency is a bad joke, so to speak so, yeah, but I do think he was, you know, kind of joking, but it was a joke that’s based in general truth. You know, black people overwhelmingly vote Democrat and it’s because they will not vote for a party that they believe hates them, IE the Republican Party. So when we look at what’s going through the typical African American voters mind, it’s like, yeah, I am going to vote Democrat because I believe the Republicans hate me. Well, then someone might ask, well, what leads you to believe that? Well, let’s just look at the last two years republicans. They turned down Juneteenth, even though Juneteenth is technically a Republican holiday the slaves were freed under President Lincoln, who was a Republican so Judy is actually Republican history. So there was some Republicans who kind of, you know, poo pooed on that and turned that down. They didn’t know what the national anthem was and thought it was trying to replace the US national anthem and that was not the case this was a poem that was written at the time of slavery that is meaningful to African Americans in this country there’s a whole history to that it is not a replacement. They defend Confederate statues and recently in Pennsylvania they pick mutilate your kids Doctor Oz over black conservative Kathy Barnett for Senate. So this is all just in the last two years when you just look at those sets of facts without any relationships, OK, you will think Republicans hate black people and there’s a lot of work we have to do as Republicans to once again rebuild that trust is a lot of relationship building. A lot of things can be solved for good policy, but long lasting changes actually happens when you are in it for the long haul to rebuild trust, to rebuild a relationship that was broken policy is a part of that because you’re putting action to reconciliation, right? So we need good policy, which I believe a lot of the Republicans support. There is a lot of great policy that comes that comes from the conservative movement slash Republican Party. So but I just wanted to point out this is some of the roadblocks that are just recent. When you ask the black person to stop voting Democrat and to start voting Republican, these are the things they will think of like well why would I do that? So yeah, Joe Biden’s absolutely telling a bad joke but in some retrospect, in truth, is based in truth that blacks will vote Democrat or Republican.

Jacob Barr :

Some people argue that abortion choice helps reduce inequalities for underprivileged people. Does abortion reduce poverty slash inequality slash injustice.

Patrina Mosley :

No abortion increases injustice, certainly for the unborn, right it is. It is a tool that is for population control, as we discussed, and it is sold abortion is sold to women and to men as a quick fix. But studies have shown us that abortion leaves physical scars such as infertility, hemorrhage, and also psychological scars of adverse mental health and suicide ideation. So no, this does not create better outcomes when we’re thinking about the person as a whole person, and not just how much money or success they can attain in their career status.

Jacob Barr :

So who is Margaret Sanger and what is the Negro Project?

Patrina Mosley :

So Margaret Sanger is the founder of what most people know of as today as Planned Parenthood but back in the nineteen twenties and thirties, it was known as the Birth Control League, and she was the founder and president of that. And also she was a part of the American Eugenics Society, which believed that there were certain people that were inferior and certain people that were superior. And that birth control will be a part of the eugenics policy of lowering the population of those they deemed inferior, while the rate of population, those they deemed superior, will continue to increase. And so Margaret Sanger is what we call the mother of eugenics the father of eugenics is Charles Darwin and his cousin Francis. I can’t remember his last name right now, but these two definitely believed in the superiority and inferiority of different human beings and actually Charles Darwin’s book of the Origins of Species his original title is The Origin of Species and Favorite Races. Very politically charged he was. He was not shy about what he was talking about at the time, but this title was later shortened under political pressure in the nineteen sixties so yeah, there it is. Marcus Sanger.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah and then As for the Negro project, tell us about what the Negro Project.

Patrina Mosley :

Was thank you. Yeah i mean, so this right here is, I mean, if this doesn’t sell you that abortion is targeting African Americans, I don’t know what is so in a letter that Marcus Sanger was writing to some funders and some donors in the Procter and Gamble family, actually, she talks about her agenda, what she’s going to do, and part of reaching that the black community is what she dubbed as a Negro project, saying, I don’t want the word to get out that we want to exterminate the Negro population so we’re going to talk about this Planned Parenthood birth control stuff under the gals of religion. And we’re going to use the minister to make sure that he preaches our message to the people should they, should it ever occur to them, should they ever figure it out, that we’re trying to put it into their to their population. So it was very diabolical, very clear of what her intentions were and when you look at where Planned Parenthood is located today, actually it is in predominantly African American and Hispanic communities. So you see today that the legacy of Margaret Sanger’s ideals is still living on when you look at the math, you can’t confuse what’s going on.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah how does that make you feel that Margaret Singer used this, you know, had this Negro project that manipulated African American pastors to because of the religious nature of the African American community. How does that make you feel that was to me, it feels like that was out of bounds like she went against, like if there’s ever like rules in war, there’s some things that we all agree that are outside the bounds of like appropriate behavior within a war. And I feel like this is going outside the bounds of, you know, beyond the rules of that’s what I might consider like the Geneva Project, the Geneva Convention of Rules for war. Like I feel like this is. Yeah i don’t even know how to describe it just feels really.

Patrina Mosley :

It.

Jacob Barr :

Feels very i don’t know i just exactly, yeah so tell me, what do you how does that make you feel that you know she used pastors?

Patrina Mosley :

Oh man i mean, this is it’s scary because it shows No Fear of God. And also it makes me feel really mad and upset at these pastors who took whatever sentiment she was able to give them to get them to put aside their values and their morals and their allegiance to God and partner with this lady on something that they knew was wrong. So I don’t know whether it was money, prestige, you know, in the community and at that time, I’m sure it was very hard when you are deemed as inferior and you have unequal opportunities to put food on the table for your family. There is at that time systematic racism and Jim Crow laws in place. And so to have this white women of stature come to you and say, hey, I think you’re somebody, I think you’re doing a great job, I want to partner with you to do XY and ZI mean i can see how it could be very tempting at that time but once again, it goes back to a fear of God, and you know, for him and that and Margaret saying if there is No Fear of God, and I would say it is better to just go ahead and do the devil’s work under the devil’s name, but do not try to do the devil’s work under God’s name. I mean that’s just total, total disregard for any type of fear of God and i’m sure she got her just reward for that. Or maybe not who knows what she did in her last breath. For those optimists out there, hopefully so but also God renders justice.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, so abortion is sometimes compared to slavery. Is this a fair slash valid comparison and please explain.

Patrina Mosley :

I would say that in some ways yes, In some ways no. Yes, abortion is parallel to slavery in the sense that they both specifically and disproportionately impact African Americans. The only thing is with slavery at least blacks were able to breathe, get their first chance at breath so that they could be used as property now that’s terrible, Being used, being seen and used as property. But I actually think abortion is a lot more sinister, if I could use that word again, and a lot worse than slavery, because you’re annihilating someone before they even get a chance to breathe their first breath. And it actually shows. Could show the hatred for African Americans before they’re even born. So in some respects, I do think abortion is worse. And I always tell people that the best way not to be a racist is to be pro-life.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, some people will say first step. Some people will say, you know, African Americans were not treated as whole persons they were treated as 2/3 of a person and the child who hasn’t had a birthday yet is not treated as a person and like that’s like that’s like the common ground piece what are your thoughts on personhood and how that was preventing African Americans from being treated as a whole person as well as the, you know, the child in the womb is not a whole person.

Patrina Mosley :

Yeah, I mean, legally, when we think about personhood, those similarities are definitely there. But because I’ve spent time in a pregnancy center where I’ve actually seen these girls come in and then sometimes choose abortion, I’ve been able to see a different side of this issue where they know it’s a person, they know it’s a human being. And politicians who talk about a woman’s right to choose all the way up to the day of birth, they know that we’re talking about a human being i think today in 2023 everyone knows what we’re talking about when we talk about abortion in terms of personhood. They know it’s the person and that’s actually worse. It was OK that we could claim ignorance in the Sixties, seventies and eighties, but we’ve grown too far in our technology and our knowledge to deny the human life is in the womb. So yes, I would agree with the fact that there are similarities in the denial illegally of personhood for sure, when we talk about engaging general public perspective and opinion on IT, people know that this is a human being. But when you phrase it and capture this argument in the lens of we have, we’re having more black babies being aborted than born alive in certain states in this country, blacks who are not even having a chance to breathe their first breath and annihilate it. That, I think, is a compelling argument because at this stage we all know we’re talking about human beings in the womb.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, so is race based abortion legal in the United States please explain.

Patrina Mosley :

Yes, in some cases it is. And I believe in one state in Ohio there was an attempt to make a law to make it illegal to abort on the basis of race. Some laws, I mean some states have legal protections on not performing abortions due to race or to the baby being a specific sex. Those laws are great, But in other states they do not have that and in Ohio’s case at the time, a couple years ago, Clarence Thomas actually wrote a great dissenting opinion in the rendering of this because it went all the way up to the Supreme Court. And he talked about the history of eugenics and Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood in this country and the legacy of Roe how the decision of Roe itself in 73 I believe was laced with eugenic concepts and even Justice Ginsburg herself, before she died, admitted that the abortion decision have more to do with population than it did women’s rights they knew. So yes, in some places there there’s protections and some places they’re not, but it’s those protections are being fought for because you can legally in some spaces abort a child just because they’re black or just because they’re a girl if you’re. This is mostly happening in states where they have a high Asian or Middle Eastern population like Minnesota. And in those places, because they’re in their culture, females are not valued as much as boys. And as Live Action investigations revealed a couple years ago, you actually have people in certain states who are able to donate to abortion clinics to pay for someone’s abortion if that person was black, so that they could assist in killing black child. So once again, it goes back to your other questions like which is worse and like, in my opinion, which I don’t think either, there’s a different opinion, either one is right or wrong, but abortion is the most racist thing you can do is to annihilate them before they even have a chance to breathe.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, is abortion more common among minorities?

Patrina Mosley :

Well, the stats say that, you know, for us, being such a low population group, it is pretty high we receive over 35 % of all the abortions happening in this country, yet we’re only 12 to 13 % and according to the 2010 US Census Bureau, we were the slowest growing ethnic group in the country hispanics are outpacing us 2 to one. So yeah, abortion is really limiting our population and limiting our ability to influence and really be a major political voting bloc on the issues that impact us most people are not going to care as much if you’re not as big of a class when it comes to voting and being a political force. The idea of strength in numbers is for real, and right now we need numbers.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, that makes sense. Has abortion choice policy been overall more helpful or harmful for black people and black families?

Patrina Mosley :

Very harmful. There are so many stories filled with regret in African American families and I would say, moreover, there’s so many untold stories that are just being hidden in the shadows. When we talked about African Americans being the most religious ethnic group in the country, you compare that to a study that was done by Lifeway that showed how many women were getting abortions that claimed a Christian denomination. And the numbers came out one in six, one in every six women who has had an abortion is sitting in your in your pews. Think about what that means for African Americans. One in six in your church. So there is so much untold devastation in the black community with black families, brothers that they never had, sisters that they never had. And as I alluded to earlier, the emotional and psychological ramifications that happened as a result of abortion that families may not be clued in on. You know, why is Auntie so angry all the time why does, you know my sister feel uncomfortable around babies? Why does my mother have an abrupt reaction to the sound of the vacuum, as some stories have been told, of triggers, of having a past abortion, that those suctioning sounds brings back bad memories. And these things are just unexplainable. They’re explained away by just so and so, being so and so, Auntie being so and so. And you know, that’s the stuff that doesn’t make it to the Women’s March. That’s the those are the stories that don’t get told by Black Lives Matter, but they do. They get they, you know, Black lives do matter and I think a good place to have those conversations are with platforms like that you want to talk about Black Lives Matter then let me tell you a story, and that be not. Let me not forget black fathers as well as there’s limited studies on how abortion impacts men, but there’s enough to demonstrate that it does. And you have a number of men, black men, white men, etcetera, who feel the regret and the guilt of not being able to stay their own child. They feel anger and regret and not feeling like they had a say in it. Or they feel anger and regret and guilt and shame for promoting it, for supporting it, when they should have stood up and been a man for their child and for that woman. So none of these things sound good for any community.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, some people argue that unequal outcomes prove that a policy slash practice is institutionally racist. In other words, if a policy hurts or helps one race slash ethnicity more than others, then that policy is racist. Along this train of thought is abortion choice policy an example of institutional racism.

Patrina Mosley :

Absolutely. I say that all the time you want to talk about systematic racism let’s start with abortion. Then we can move on to other issues, but certainly more so than abortion now, I do not believe that when there, when there are different outcomes that it automatically means unfairness or discrimination. What we should be looking for is not equal outcomes but equal opportunity. And that’s the difference between those who see the truth for what it is, between those who advocate for critical race theory and those who live in reality. To say that there are different outcomes for different people who are different places in their lives. And although we’ve been asking for all that anyone has been asking for in this country, regardless of color, is equal opportunity. Hence why we have non discrimination laws in place. And thank God for the civil rights movement where we had structural racism for a very long time. After 400 years of slavery, we had 100 plus years of Jim Crow laws and structural racism like I mentioned so, yeah, But when it comes to abortion, as I alluded to earlier, you look at the numbers of how we’re the smallest minority, one of the smallest minorities in this country. Planned Parenthood, which is the largest abortion provider in the country, is predominantly in our neighborhoods. Ok, By 80 percent, 80 % of your abortion meals are in black and Hispanic neighborhoods. You kidding me? But then walking distance on top of that, having a founder who was a part of the American eugenics movement, who established the Negro Project and wanted to exterminate the Negro race. Ok, which is we’re doing math here we’re just adding all this up. And you say that this isn’t racism. It looks like racism to me when it’s walks like a duck, quacks like a duck. It’s a duck.

Jacob Barr :

Yeah, that makes sense. Some people call abortion in America a black genocide. Is this overstating or misrepresenting the case?

Patrina Mosley :

No, I don’t think so at all. I mean, we’ve been building the case actually to answer that question it abortion is black genocide it makes absolutely no sense because let’s just let’s just take the numbers down a little bit more when we talk about African Americans in general in this population, we generally tie it out 12 to 13 %, OK. But when we’re talking about those who have the ability to get pregnant, which we all know as women, common sense, right, Which we all know as women, black women make up 7 % of the population, just seven, and we’re getting 35 or more % of all the abortions. On top of you know, Planned Parenthood has specific social media handles and Hispanic women to get them to a board and paid campaigns to outreach to black women and to his governmental report that yeah. And we are the slowest growing minority group in this country. When you look at any type of categories of race, OK, just anyone just pick a random one and includes race and there’s black and Hispanics in there. Hispanics will out percentage us by two to 3 %. Ok. And yet we’ve been in this country since, as early as history tells us, since the fourteen hundreds OK, so it doesn’t make any sense why are we growing at the slowest rate possible than any other ethnic group in the country that is over Asians, that’s over Hispanics and that’s over what they deem the category as other or will fall into the other. And yet these people have mostly which sometimes the MENA, Middle Eastern North Africa racial category migrate eighteen hundred so yes, it is a genocide that we’re not growing as fast as we should compared to other ethnic groups that have been in this country, you know, not as long all.

Jacob Barr :

Right so abortion clinics predominate in black slash minority communities. What does it say about the abortion industry?

Patrina Mosley :

I think it clearly says that they target black people, they target them for abortion, and they literally tell them that it’s better for them to abort than to carry to term. In other words, it’s better for you to terminate your child than to give life. So you can’t really do the math any other way there, that this is genocide and that this is institutional racism here with the abortion industry.

Jacob Barr :

Some people claim that the biggest problem that black families face is absent fathers. Others say that’s a myth, or that the bigger underlying problem is corruption slash racism in the justice system. More specifically, the justice system is targeting black men to pull them away from their families and put them in jail, effectively creating the new Jim Crow. Who’s telling the truth here and how does this impact abortion rates in black homes?

Patrina Mosley :

I think there is definitely a lack of fathers in black homes, for sure the numbers prove that, but I wouldn’t say that that’s the number one issue that is to the detriment of the black family. When you look at marriage rates, when you look at the abortion rates, we see a family deficit where we do need a mom and a dad who are married in a home then having kids. And that has been dubbed as the success sequence by left-leaning institutions such as the Brookings Institute, where the success sequence lays out that you finish high school, you get an education, you get married, then you have kids, you do those things in that order, and your chances of prosperity and success increases. Though there is not a guarantee of equal outcomes, this pretty much guarantees you an equal opportunity to access all types of outcomes. So I would not say fatherlessness is the most detrimental issue, but it is one out of many that impacts the family, which is the most important element in our society.

Jacob Barr :

Yep, that makes sense. Black lives matter. Blm has raised mixed feelings among black people in America. We can all grant that racism still exists and there is plenty of work still to be done and it to heal racial animosity, to hold authorities accountable such as police, courts, etcetera, and to address other race based problems in America. Nevertheless, BLM has also aligned with certain progressive and left wing political causes including abortion choice policy and dismantling the western nuclear family. What exactly is BLM and what are your thoughts on BLM in relation to family and abortion policy?

Patrina Mosley :

Well, Black Lives Matter, first of all, got his start rather quickly in 2014 after a fatal shooting of a unarmed black kid. And it came about so fast there was a whole logo, there was a branding, there was funding. And it came about so fast that it was kind of suspicious. And there’s been some research done to show that it is backed by major liberal donors, even donors from China, to push this progressive idea of destroying. The Western Hemisphere destroying any type of American exceptionalism, any type of American ideals. And that starts with breaking down the family, all in the name of black lives interesting enough. So the smokescreen is we’re going to build an organization in the name of racial justice. But when you go to the mission page at the time, it’s been scrubbed now when you go to the missions page, it talks about, like you said, destroying the heterosexual family unit, being for open borders, progressive LGBTQI ideology and the like. But what does that have to do with black lives? Absolutely nothing. And when we look at some of the fatalities that have happened in this country that they’ve highlighted, unfortunately, it’s always those who don’t paint the best picture for the black communities are people who have disobeyed authority. And you do you look at that and you have to wonder, well, and you have all of these other Marxist ideas on top of promoting cases that have a blatant disregard for authority. And you’re being funded by donors from China. Well, and you’re not really doing much for the black community or black lives, black men. Well, this looks like you’re taking advantage of black hurt in this country you’re using the hurt, the real hurt. There is real hurt in this country from African Americans, but what we find is these institutions are using the real herd of African Americans to push a Marxist evil agenda on this country yeah.

Jacob Barr :

Good points in your opinion, what’s the biggest misconception that minorities tend to believe about abortion?

Patrina Mosley :

I would say that it’s a woman’s right. You would think that it would be something race specific, but it’s really not. When I come in contact with these girls who come into the pregnancy center with their boyfriend, sometimes the baby, he’s a baby, he’s the father of the baby. It’s all about a woman’s choice. They don’t want to feel like they’re infringing on a woman’s right to choose because for over 40 years now, abortion has been the norm. So we have a lot of reversing of ideals to do so, necessarily it doesn’t have to do with race, it has to do with what we’re in the age of respecting women and we want to push consent in all things, right sexual activity, Well, a right to choose has become a part of that, unfortunately.

Jacob Barr :

What would you say? What would you like to say about racism and abortion that you were not asked about today?

Patrina Mosley :

Well, I would just add that if we really talk about how black lives matter, they matter in the womb, they black lives matter from the moment of conception, just like all lives matter. All lives do matter from the moment of conception, whether they’re black, white, Asian or Hispanic. And when we look at the math of how we are the slowest growing ethnic group in this country, the history and roots of eugenics that continue to lace our communities today, overwhelmingly, we must ask ourselves, does black lives really matter when we push abortion when we do not abolish it? It’s just like slavery when we look at the overwhelming disproportionate impact, we must abolish it. If we say that black lives matter, we must abolish abortion.

Sign up for email notifications when new episodes are published.

Our sponsor for this episode include Heritage House, Patriot Insurance and iRapture.com.